• First published in 2004 as Bartholomew’s Notes on Religion (BNOR).

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James Delingpole Promotes “Sabbatean-Frankists” Conspiracy Theory

James Delingpole, a British commentator associated with Breitbart and much given to podcasting, has recently promoted as a stand-alone clip of one of his guests expounding on the supposed global influence of a Jewish cult called the “Sabbatean-Frankists”. His interlocutor was one Michael O’Bernicia, a comedian who is better known for his stated plan to bring private prosecutions against all of Britain’s MPs, later scaled down to just prosecuting Matt Hancock. Here’s what O’Bernicia said to Delingpole:

…This Babylonian nefarious cult of evildoers, it does have a name: name is the Sabbatean-Frankists. The Sabbatean-Frankists were founded by Sabbatai Zevi in 1666. Sabbatai Zevi was a man who proclaimed that he was the foretold Jewish messiah, only that his reign over the Jews as he described [it] was entirely predicated on his conviction, and that of his disciples, that the purpose of his life was to bring about an inversion of good and evil; in other words, to turn evil into good and good into evil so that no one can tell the difference anymore. And in his mad ramblings he dictated that everybody must follow this creed to use deception or inversion against all their enemies, and all of their enemies constituted everybody who wasn’t in the cult.

Now, the reason I know this is because prior to ’91 there was an awful lot of material around about on this subject because it links directly to the Rothschild cartel, because that there is much evidence around to say that the Rothschilds are the same bloodline as Sabbatai Zevi and another man who lived in the eighteenth century called Jacob Frank in Frankfurt.

Now, Jacob Frank in Frankfurt was one of the three people, along with Amschel Rothschild and Adam Weishaupt, they they founded the Bavarian Illuminati around about 1770. Now, when this happened it was a complete secret, and what they did was they created a pact; and the pact was that they would take control of every surviving royal bloodline and and every one of the major religions, and they would take control from within in order to subvert it according to Sabbatai Zevi’s doctrine. And [to] hide Sabbatai Zevi they started calling it Frankism and that’s what it became known as and then it developed into the Frankfurt School.

What did the Frankfurt School invent? Every leftist ideology every rightist ideology and they created the false left right paradigm. Because the truth is fascism and communism are virtually identical virtually identical but they have one thing above all others in common and that is that the banker’s power remains in place but is used more aggressively that’s the major difference. Clan economy, complete control of everyone’s lives.

Doubtless, Delingpole and O’Bernicia would deny that this conspiracy theory is anti-Semitic, on the grounds that it refers only to some Jews. Indeed, it actually has Jewish provenance: the same scenario is outlined in a 1974 book by a rabbi named Marvin Stuart Antelman titled To Eliminate the Opiate (tagline: “The Frightening Inside Story of Communist and Conspiratorial Group Efforts to Destroy Jews, Judaism and Israel”) (1). However, as I’ve argued before, “Rothschild” conspiracy beliefs emerged out of an explicitly anti-Semitic context (as discussed by Brian Cathcart here), and as a paranoid pseudo-explanation for human affairs they lead back into it.

And that’s before we get onto the problem that the theory is useless and foolish – all-embracing and unfalsifiable, and derived from wild extrapolations that are completely superfluous to historical understanding.

Delingpole has long been a vector for the spread of misinformation and disinformation within mainstream media – a few years ago he seemed to be a regular presence on TV chat shows mocking the idea of climate change, despite lacking credentials, and in 2019 he was an early promotor of the “Traitors’ Chart” conspiracy webpage that was later picked up by Tom Newton Dunn at the Sun after it was revamped as “Hijacked Labour” to hide its origins. He has also always been something of a conspiracy theorist, spotting hidden left-wing influences on socio-cultural trends – back in 2011, for instance, he managed to churn out 1500 words for the Daily Mail (or maybe the Mail on Sunday) about why the BBC using the BCE/CE dating system rather than BC/AD was due to a “Marxist plot” that could be traced back to Herbert Marcuse.

Delingpole’s full embrace of the conspiracy milieu, though, coincides with the spread of Covid; I noticed last year that he was in communication with Richie Allen, and last month he was commending David Icke as “a visionary genius”. A few days ago he and his brother Richard Delingpole made a video in which they congratulated each other on being “red-pilled”. He also pondered whether the Beatles had been created by the Tavistock Institute.

Note

1. Antleman’s book drew in part on research by the scholar Gershom Scholem. Scholem received a copy, which he was moved to inscribe with the words “nonsense based on me!!!“.

New Series Charts Rise of Clay Clark and Mike Flynn’s Conspiracy Rallies

From influential Christian Right media CEO Stephen Strang:

I just watched the first episode of the new ReAwakening Docuseries that documents what’s happening in America, and I was blown away.

It’s riveting and even better than the trailer shows. It’s a powerful story about how Clay Clark’s vision to reawaken America is taking fire across the country.

ReAwakening tells the story behind why Clay Clark joined with Gen. Michael Flynn to hold huge ReAwaken America Tour events in Oklahoma, California, Florida, Texas and many more locations.

I even had the privilege of speaking at several of these events.

The series is made by Strang’s Charisma Media in cooperation with SperoPictures, which previously brought us The Trump I Know. This was a collection of interviews with women around Trump, in which the filmmakers discovered that the women and the president “share a deep love for God, family, and country”. That documentary came about after its producer, Joe Knopp, “struck up a friendship with Lara Trump, the president’s daughter-in-law, while premiering his pro-life film ‘Unplanned’ for White House staff”.

The “ReAwaken America Tour” (originally branded as “Health an Freedom” conferences) is a concerted effort to evangelise churches with pro-Trump conspiracy rhetoric and coarseness, with Flynn being the biggest draw. The most recent rally, at John Hagee’s Cornerstone Church, featured Clark leading the crowd with a chant of “Let’s Go Brandon” (a surrogate phrase for “Fuck Joe Biden”) and included among its speakers Alex Jones. The next event, scheduled for Keith Craft’s Elevate Life Church in Dallas, will feature Eric Trump. While Hagee was embarrassed by “Let’s Go Brandon”, Craft is less likely to be concerned: back in March, he used a men only “Warrior Night” at his church to mock the government as “pussies” over anti-Covid measures.

Clay Clark believes that his own role in all this is prophetic:

The ReAwakening docuseries details at least two prophecies connected to Clark’s current work. “It turned out—you can find it on YouTube—in 1963, Kenneth Hagin said there would be an atheistic, communist, Marxist and racially divisive spirit that would descend upon America—sound familiar?—and that the spark of the revival would start from Tulsa, Oklahoma,” Clark explains. This August, when he held his first “Health and Freedom” event, later renamed the ReAwaken America Tour, his team called civic centers and event centers, but the only facility willing to host the tour was Rhema Bible College, led by Hagin’s son, Kenneth W. Hagin.

As the popularity of the tour grew and the demand for Clark to appear on various media outlets rose, someone sent him the Kim Clement prophecy from April 20, 2013, that seems to have a clear connection to his calling to reawaken America. It mentions a “man by the name of Mr. Clark,” and says in part, “You have been determined through your prayers to influence this nation. You’re watching me; you’re an influential person. The Spirit of God says, ‘Hear the word of the prophet to you as a king, I will open that door that you prayed about.'”

Clark has some success as a business entrepreneur, and so it is natural that he would have felt an affinity with the Hagins and their prosperity gospel teachings. Clement, meanwhile, has received posthumous attention over a 2007 “prophecy” in which he predicted that “Trump shall become a trumpet”. The context seems to have been that Clement was predicting that Trump and Bill Gates would become evangelists and that Rudy Giuliani would become president, but the most successful prophets are obscure enough to facilitate various interpretations. Clement’s “Mr Clark” (or “Mr Clarke”) was supposedly someone watching him at the time he was speaking; this person also “came on the show”, which suggests a member of a live audience.

Commending the documentary series, Clark told Strang:

So if you’re out there, and you say, ‘I want to know in the natural the truth about medical fraud, election fraud, religious fraud, mainstream media fraud, ReAwakening is a great movie to watch. If you’re saying, ‘Spiritually, I just want to be educated, I want to be inspired’ … it’s going to be fabulous.”

Clay here is slightly downplaying the QAnon-adjacent character of his rallies: the first time I heard of him was a year ago, when he interviewed Lin Wood on a podcast. Clark’s introduction referred to the “Satanic Luciferian Left”, and Wood expounded on elite “paedophilia” and “satanic worship”.

Wood has also participated in Clark’s rallies, and it remains to be seen where he stands regarding Wood’s recent denunciations of Flynn (the feud is also awkward for Strang, who previously ran an article linking Wood’s election fraud claims to his “intimacy with the Holy Spirit”)